UCL CENTRE FOR LANGUAGES & INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION (CLIE)

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1054 items found in the english section!

The exquisite Rosslyn Chapel is a masterpiece in stone. It used to be one of Scotland's best kept secrets, but it became world-famous when it was featured in Dan Brown's the Da Vinci Code.

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art historyhistoryscotland

The exquisite Rosslyn Chapel is a masterpiece in stone. It used to be one of Scotland's best kept secrets, but it became world-famous when it was featured in Dan Brown's the Da Vinci Code.

How modern Britain is still defined by the battle between Cavaliers (panache, pleasure and individuality) and Roundheads (modesty, discipline, equality, and state intervention).

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britainhistorypoliticspublic policysociety

How modern Britain is still defined by the battle between Cavaliers (panache, pleasure and individuality) and Roundheads (modesty, discipline, equality, and state intervention).

  • Royal Institution Christmas Lectures 2012

  • BBC

Series of lectures on a single topic, presenting scientific subjects to a general audience in an informative and entertaining manner

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chemistryhistory of sciencescience

Series of lectures on a single topic, presenting scientific subjects to a general audience in an informative and entertaining manner

The medieval alchemists made elements react to create magnificent shows, enthralling kings and commoners alike, but their secrets were never revealed until now.

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chemistryhistory of sciencescience

The medieval alchemists made elements react to create magnificent shows, enthralling kings and commoners alike, but their secrets were never revealed until now.

In the second of this year's Christmas Lectures, Dr Peter Wothers drinks from the fountain and finds out whether the elements lurking in the water can restore his youth. Along the way he discovers how exploding balloons could solve the energy crisis, how water contains the remains of the most violent reactions on Earth and that the real secret to eternal youth might be drinking no water at all.

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chemistryhistory of sciencescience

In the second of this year's Christmas Lectures, Dr Peter Wothers drinks from the fountain and finds out whether the elements lurking in the water can restore his youth. Along the way he discovers how exploding balloons could solve the energy crisis, how water contains the remains of the most violent reactions on Earth and that the real secret to eternal youth might be drinking no water at all.

In the final Christmas Lecture, Dr Peter Wothers explores the elements within the earth and discovers just how difficult it is for chemists to extract the planet's greatest treasures. He discovers how our knowledge of the elements can allow us to levitate, turn carbon dioxide into diamonds and maybe turn lead into gold.

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chemistryhistory of sciencescience

In the final Christmas Lecture, Dr Peter Wothers explores the elements within the earth and discovers just how difficult it is for chemists to extract the planet's greatest treasures. He discovers how our knowledge of the elements can allow us to levitate, turn carbon dioxide into diamonds and maybe turn lead into gold.

Jonathan Dimbleby explores ten thousand miles of one of the world's most awe-inspiring countries. Summer 2006. Having lived through the Cold War, Jonathan makes his first stop in the city of Murmansk, which stands as a reminder to the years when England and Russia were close allies in a war of survival against the Nazis.

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historyrussiasociety

Jonathan Dimbleby explores ten thousand miles of one of the world's most awe-inspiring countries. Summer 2006. Having lived through the Cold War, Jonathan makes his first stop in the city of Murmansk, which stands as a reminder to the years when England and Russia were close allies in a war of survival against the Nazis.

With a PhD in papyrology, Margaret Mountford goes in search of the truth behind the legend of Sappho, the most controversial writer of the ancient world and the first authentic woman's voice in western history.

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classical worldlesbospapyrologysappho

With a PhD in papyrology, Margaret Mountford goes in search of the truth behind the legend of Sappho, the most controversial writer of the ancient world and the first authentic woman's voice in western history.

  • Science Britannica

  • BBC

Professor Brian Cox introduces Britain's science heroes.

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britainhistoryhistory of sciencescience

Professor Brian Cox introduces Britain's science heroes.

Professor Brian Cox guides viewers through 350 years of British science to reveal what science really is, who the people are who practise it, and how it is inextricably linked to the past, present and future of each and every one of us.

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britainhistoryhistory of sciencescience

Professor Brian Cox guides viewers through 350 years of British science to reveal what science really is, who the people are who practise it, and how it is inextricably linked to the past, present and future of each and every one of us.

This time, Professor Cox celebrates Britain's pivotal role in creating modern science. From performing Isaac Newton's iconic light experiment to meeting a wartime code breaker and making hydrogen explosions, Professor Cox leads the way through 300 years of British history.

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britainhistoryhistory of scienceisaac newtonscience

This time, Professor Cox celebrates Britain's pivotal role in creating modern science. From performing Isaac Newton's iconic light experiment to meeting a wartime code breaker and making hydrogen explosions, Professor Cox leads the way through 300 years of British history.

Professor Brian Cox ends his homage to British Science by looking at how discoveries are made, asking whether it is better to let the scientists do their own thing, and hope for happy accidents, or to only back scientific winners at the risk of missing the occasional gems

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britainhistoryhistory of sciencescience

Professor Brian Cox ends his homage to British Science by looking at how discoveries are made, asking whether it is better to let the scientists do their own thing, and hope for happy accidents, or to only back scientific winners at the risk of missing the occasional gems

Professor Iain Stewart reveals the story behind the Scottish physicist who was Einstein's hero; James Clerk Maxwell. Maxwell's discoveries not only inspired Einstein, but they helped shape our modern world - allowing the development of radio, TV, mobile phones and much more.

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biographyhistory of sciencejames clerk maxwellphysicsscotland

Professor Iain Stewart reveals the story behind the Scottish physicist who was Einstein's hero; James Clerk Maxwell. Maxwell's discoveries not only inspired Einstein, but they helped shape our modern world - allowing the development of radio, TV, mobile phones and much more.

Film telling the story of the greatest physicists of the 20th century and the discoveries they made, told in their own words. Men and women who transformed our understanding of the universe, from unlocking the secrets of the atom to solving the mysteries of the cosmos.

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astronomyeinsteinhistory of sciencephysicsstephen hawking

Film telling the story of the greatest physicists of the 20th century and the discoveries they made, told in their own words. Men and women who transformed our understanding of the universe, from unlocking the secrets of the atom to solving the mysteries of the cosmos.

  • Seven Ages of Britain

  • Channel 4

Bettany Hughes explores the history of Britain from a fresh perspective: through the lives and aspirations of the ordinary citizens

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britainhistorysocialhistory

Bettany Hughes explores the history of Britain from a fresh perspective: through the lives and aspirations of the ordinary citizens

David Dimbleby tells the story of Britain through its art and treasure. The first part of the chronicle begins with the Roman invasion and ends with the Norman Conquest.

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artart historybritainhistory

David Dimbleby tells the story of Britain through its art and treasure. The first part of the chronicle begins with the Roman invasion and ends with the Norman Conquest.

Britain's art from the murder of Thomas Becket in 1170 to the death of Richard II in 1400.

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artart historybritainhistory

Britain's art from the murder of Thomas Becket in 1170 to the death of Richard II in 1400.

Spanning from Henry VIII's accession in 1509 to Shakespeare's Henry VIII 100 years later.

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artart historybritainhistory

Spanning from Henry VIII's accession in 1509 to Shakespeare's Henry VIII 100 years later.

In the 17th century British people learned to question everything, resulting in civil war.

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artart historybritainhistory

In the 17th century British people learned to question everything, resulting in civil war.

The story of Britain in the 18th century, as a new 'middle' class emerged.

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artart historybritainhistory

The story of Britain in the 18th century, as a new 'middle' class emerged.

The story of the British Empire from 1750 to 1900, revealed through its art and treasures.

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artart historybritainhistory

The story of the British Empire from 1750 to 1900, revealed through its art and treasures.

In the last episode, David Dimbleby looks at how the 20th century saw ordinary Britons upturning ancient power structures and class hierarchies.

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artart historybritainhistory

In the last episode, David Dimbleby looks at how the 20th century saw ordinary Britons upturning ancient power structures and class hierarchies.

Bettany Hughes provides an insight into how British inhabitants evolved over 8,000 years, beginning with the story of man's battle with the environment in 6,000 BC, when global warming transformed Britain into an island covered by dense, impenetrable forests.

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britainhistory

Bettany Hughes provides an insight into how British inhabitants evolved over 8,000 years, beginning with the story of man's battle with the environment in 6,000 BC, when global warming transformed Britain into an island covered by dense, impenetrable forests.

Sweeping changes transformed the lives of the masses beyond recognition during the Bronze and Iron Ages.

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britainhistory

Sweeping changes transformed the lives of the masses beyond recognition during the Bronze and Iron Ages.

The gradual collapse of the Roman Empire led to the disintegration of Britannia. For the next 600 years people would watch their homelands become battlegrounds invaded and plundered by men from Scandinavia and northern Europe, hungry for power and land.

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britainhistory

The gradual collapse of the Roman Empire led to the disintegration of Britannia. For the next 600 years people would watch their homelands become battlegrounds invaded and plundered by men from Scandinavia and northern Europe, hungry for power and land.

Bettany Hughes considers the fifth age of Britain, from 1066 to 1350, charting the period between two shattering historical events - the invasion of William the Conqueror and the Black Death.

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black deathbritainhistorywilliam the conqueror

Bettany Hughes considers the fifth age of Britain, from 1066 to 1350, charting the period between two shattering historical events - the invasion of William the Conqueror and the Black Death.

The penultimate programme in the series follows the course of the greatest revolution in British history: a revolution of the mind.

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black deathbritainhenry viiihistoryplague

The penultimate programme in the series follows the course of the greatest revolution in British history: a revolution of the mind.

At a time when most ships were built to traditional designs in wood, and powered by sail, Isambard Kingdom Brunel’s colossal ship, the Great Eastern, was almost 700 feet long and built of iron. His vision was that it should carry 4,000 passengers, in magnificent style, as far as the Antipodes - without needing to refuel.

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architecturebruneibuilt environmentengineeringhistoryindustrial revolutionships

At a time when most ships were built to traditional designs in wood, and powered by sail, Isambard Kingdom Brunel’s colossal ship, the Great Eastern, was almost 700 feet long and built of iron. His vision was that it should carry 4,000 passengers, in magnificent style, as far as the Antipodes - without needing to refuel.

In 1869, John Roebling won the contract to build the largest bridge in the world, the Brooklyn Bridge in New York. It was to stretch 1,600 feet, in one giant leap, across the wide and turbulent East River that separates New York from Brooklyn.

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architecturebuilt environmentengineeringhistoryindustrial revolutionnew yorkthe brooklyn bridgeusa

In 1869, John Roebling won the contract to build the largest bridge in the world, the Brooklyn Bridge in New York. It was to stretch 1,600 feet, in one giant leap, across the wide and turbulent East River that separates New York from Brooklyn.

In 1800 Robert Stevenson set about building a lighthouse on the deadly Bell Rock reef off the east of Scotland.

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architecturebuilt environmentengineeringhistoryindustrial revolutionlighthousescotland

In 1800 Robert Stevenson set about building a lighthouse on the deadly Bell Rock reef off the east of Scotland.