UCL CENTRE FOR LANGUAGES & INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION (CLIE)

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321 items found!
  • Chance of a Lifetime (Penguin Readers 3)

  • Margaret Iggulden & Julia Allen , Penguin , 2000

Helen is traveling through Europe on her first job after university. It's a wonderful chance to travel and meet people - a chance of a lifetime. But what secrets are the other people on the trip hiding? And what does Helen discover about herself?

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Helen is traveling through Europe on her first job after university. It's a wonderful chance to travel and meet people - a chance of a lifetime. But what secrets are the other people on the trip hiding? And what does Helen discover about herself?

  • On the Road (Penguin Reader 5)

  • Jack Kerouac , Penguin , 1999

Love, jazz, and excitement! These are all part of Sal Paradise's adventures 'on the road' with wild friend Dean Moriarty, and their crazy companions, as they travel across the USA

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Love, jazz, and excitement! These are all part of Sal Paradise's adventures 'on the road' with wild friend Dean Moriarty, and their crazy companions, as they travel across the USA

  • Photo of the Tall Man (Penguin Readers 3)

  • Stephen Rabley , Penguin , 2000

Kelly Logan is travelling to London to stay with her Uncle Max. She reads about the Tall Man in the newspaper. He is a very dangerous criminal, and the police think he is in London. Then strange things start happening. Does Kelly's uncle know more about the Tall Man than the police?

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Kelly Logan is travelling to London to stay with her Uncle Max. She reads about the Tall Man in the newspaper. He is a very dangerous criminal, and the police think he is in London. Then strange things start happening. Does Kelly's uncle know more about the Tall Man than the police?

  • Round the World in Eighty Days: Level 5 (Pearson English Graded Readers)

  • Jules Verne , , 2008

Phileas Fogg is living quietly in London. Then he makes a bet that he can travel around the world in eighty days. The result is a crazy, exciting race against time across Europe, Asia and America. There are many dangers along the way – and a detective who wants to arrest him!

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Phileas Fogg is living quietly in London. Then he makes a bet that he can travel around the world in eighty days. The result is a crazy, exciting race against time across Europe, Asia and America. There are many dangers along the way – and a detective who wants to arrest him!

  • Stories From Shakespeare (Penguin Readers 3)

  • Anne Collins, Andy Hopkins, & Jocelyn Potter , Penguin , 2000

These stories are based on some of Shakespeare's most famous plays. We travel to Venice, Greece, Denmark and Rome, and meet many different people. There is a greedy moneylender, a fairy king and queen, a man who is 'the finest Roman of them all', and a young prince who discovers that his uncle murdered his father.

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These stories are based on some of Shakespeare's most famous plays. We travel to Venice, Greece, Denmark and Rome, and meet many different people. There is a greedy moneylender, a fairy king and queen, a man who is 'the finest Roman of them all', and a young prince who discovers that his uncle murdered his father.

  • The Accidental Tourist (Longman Fiction Lower Intermediate)

  • Anne Tyler , Longman , 1998

After the death of his son, everything starts to go wrong for travel writer Macon Leary. First his wife leaves him. Then he has an accident and breaks his leg. And then his dog, Edward, starts attacking people. Help arrives in the form of Muriel, the loud and colourful dog trainer from the Meow-Bow Animal Hospital, who offers to solve Edwadr's problems.

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After the death of his son, everything starts to go wrong for travel writer Macon Leary. First his wife leaves him. Then he has an accident and breaks his leg. And then his dog, Edward, starts attacking people. Help arrives in the form of Muriel, the loud and colourful dog trainer from the Meow-Bow Animal Hospital, who offers to solve Edwadr's problems.

  • The Canterbury Tales (Penguin Readers 3)

  • Geoffrey Chaucer , Penguin , 2000

"We'll give a free dinner to the person who tells the best story. Now, put up your hands if you agree." The pilgrims all held up their hands. A group of pilgrims are travelling together for five days from London to Canterbury. On the way, each pilgrim has to tell a story to keep the others amused. Some stories are happy, and some are sad. But they all have a message, and we can learn from them

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"We'll give a free dinner to the person who tells the best story. Now, put up your hands if you agree." The pilgrims all held up their hands. A group of pilgrims are travelling together for five days from London to Canterbury. On the way, each pilgrim has to tell a story to keep the others amused. Some stories are happy, and some are sad. But they all have a message, and we can learn from them

  • The Way Home (Cambridge English Readers 6)

  • Sue Leather , Cambridge University Press , 2004

Eight journeys which change lives forever - a New York fashion buyer returns to her English home, a successful author meets an old friend, a reporter travels to an execution, a lorry driver gives an escaped prisoner a lift, a taxi driver picks up 'Bruce Lee', a bus ride home changes a film writer's life and work, a man's love for a tram driver leads him to follow her, and four strangers meet at a motel for the first and last time.

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Eight journeys which change lives forever - a New York fashion buyer returns to her English home, a successful author meets an old friend, a reporter travels to an execution, a lorry driver gives an escaped prisoner a lift, a taxi driver picks up 'Bruce Lee', a bus ride home changes a film writer's life and work, a man's love for a tram driver leads him to follow her, and four strangers meet at a motel for the first and last time.

  • Tom Jones (Penguin Readers 6)

  • Henry Fielding , Penguin , 1999

When Mr Allworthy finds a baby boy in his bed, he decides to keep him and gives him the name Tom Jones. But Tom can’t keep out of trouble, and is sent away. Follow Tom’s travels and read of his adventures along the roads of eighteenth-century England.

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When Mr Allworthy finds a baby boy in his bed, he decides to keep him and gives him the name Tom Jones. But Tom can’t keep out of trouble, and is sent away. Follow Tom’s travels and read of his adventures along the roads of eighteenth-century England.

  • What I Talk about When I Talk about Running: A Memoir

  • Haruki Murakami , Vintage Books , 2009

In 1982, having sold his jazz bar to devote himself to writing, Murakami began running to keep fit. A year later, he'd completed a solo course from Athens to Marathon, and now, after dozens of such races, he reflects upon the influence the sport has had on his life and on his writing. Equal parts travelogue, training log, and reminiscence, this revealing memoir covers his four-month preparation for the 2005 New York City Marathon and settings ranging from Tokyo's Jingu Gaien gardens, where he once shared the course with an Olympian, to the Charles River in Boston. Funny and sobering, playful and philosophical, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running is a must read for fans of this masterful yet private writer as well as for the exploding population of athletes who find similar satisfaction in distance running.

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In 1982, having sold his jazz bar to devote himself to writing, Murakami began running to keep fit. A year later, he'd completed a solo course from Athens to Marathon, and now, after dozens of such races, he reflects upon the influence the sport has had on his life and on his writing. Equal parts travelogue, training log, and reminiscence, this revealing memoir covers his four-month preparation for the 2005 New York City Marathon and settings ranging from Tokyo's Jingu Gaien gardens, where he once shared the course with an Olympian, to the Charles River in Boston. Funny and sobering, playful and philosophical, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running is a must read for fans of this masterful yet private writer as well as for the exploding population of athletes who find similar satisfaction in distance running.

  • Interactive Picture Dictionary

Thousands of essential words divided into topics, including clothes, food and drink, home, leisure, medical, nature, people, travel, places and work. The program offers three levels of interactive quiz to help you memorise new words. And you can record your voice and compare it with the model.

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Thousands of essential words divided into topics, including clothes, food and drink, home, leisure, medical, nature, people, travel, places and work. The program offers three levels of interactive quiz to help you memorise new words. And you can record your voice and compare it with the model.

  • Interactive Picture Dictionary

Thousands of essential words divided into topics, including clothes, food and drink, home, leisure, medical, nature, people, travel, places and work. The programme offers three levels of interactive quiz to help you memorise new words. And you can record your voice and compare it with the model.

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Thousands of essential words divided into topics, including clothes, food and drink, home, leisure, medical, nature, people, travel, places and work. The programme offers three levels of interactive quiz to help you memorise new words. And you can record your voice and compare it with the model.

  • Interactive Picture Dictionary

Thousands of essential words divided into topics, including clothes, food and drink, home, leisure, medical, nature, people, travel, places and work. The program offers three levels of interactive quiz to help you memorise new words. And you can record your voice and compare it with the model.

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Thousands of essential words divided into topics, including clothes, food and drink, home, leisure, medical, nature, people, travel, places and work. The program offers three levels of interactive quiz to help you memorise new words. And you can record your voice and compare it with the model.

  • Interactive Picture Dictionary

Thousands of essential words divided into topics, including clothes, food and drink, home, leisure, medical, nature, people, travel, places and work. The programme offers three levels of interactive quiz to help you memorise new words. You can record your voice and compare it with the model.

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Thousands of essential words divided into topics, including clothes, food and drink, home, leisure, medical, nature, people, travel, places and work. The programme offers three levels of interactive quiz to help you memorise new words. You can record your voice and compare it with the model.

Diploma Lecture 2013

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artcontemporary arthistory of arttravel

Diploma Lecture 2013

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Diploma Lecture 2014

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cultureculture shockmental healthmigrationsociologytravellingwork

Diploma Lecture 2014

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eastern europegeographyliteraturetravelwriting

UPCH 2008

  • Arhur C Clarke - The Science and the Fiction

  • Heather Cooper

In October 1945, the magazine Wireless World published an article by a relatively unknown writer and rocket enthusiast. Its title was: "Extra-Terrestrial Relays: Can Rocket Stations Give World Wide Radio Coverage?" Today, the author's name is known throughout the world. He is the science fiction writer Arthur C Clarke, and his prediction of satellite communications has come true in ways even he never imagined. Heather Couper travels to Sir Arthur's home in Sri Lanka to hear his own story.

In October 1945, the magazine Wireless World published an article by a relatively unknown writer and rocket enthusiast. Its title was: "Extra-Terrestrial Relays: Can Rocket Stations Give World Wide Radio Coverage?" Today, the author's name is known throughout the world. He is the science fiction writer Arthur C Clarke, and his prediction of satellite communications has come true in ways even he never imagined. Heather Couper travels to Sir Arthur's home in Sri Lanka to hear his own story.

  • Book of the Week - Adrift in Caledonia

  • Nick Thorpe

Nick Thorpe takes the reader on boat-hopping odyssey through Scotland's canals, lochs and coastal waters, from the industrial Clyde to the scattered islands of Viking Shetland. Whether rowing a coracle with a chapter of monks, scanning for the elusive Nessie, hitting the rocks with Captain Calamity or clinging to the rigging of a tall ship, Thorpe weaves a narrative that is by turns funny and poignant - a nautical pilgrimage for any who have ever been tempted to try a new path just to see where it might take them. Part travelogue, part memoir, Adrift in Caledonia is a unique portrait of a sea-fringed nation

Nick Thorpe takes the reader on boat-hopping odyssey through Scotland's canals, lochs and coastal waters, from the industrial Clyde to the scattered islands of Viking Shetland. Whether rowing a coracle with a chapter of monks, scanning for the elusive Nessie, hitting the rocks with Captain Calamity or clinging to the rigging of a tall ship, Thorpe weaves a narrative that is by turns funny and poignant - a nautical pilgrimage for any who have ever been tempted to try a new path just to see where it might take them. Part travelogue, part memoir, Adrift in Caledonia is a unique portrait of a sea-fringed nation

  • Book of the Week - American Journey

  • Alistair Cooke

Alistair Cooke, then a Washington correspondent for "The Guardian," recognised a great story to be told in investigating at first hand the effects of the Second World War on America and the daily lives of Americans as they adjusted to radically new circumstances. Within weeks of the Pearl Harbor attack, with a reporter's zeal, Cooke set off on a circuit of the entire country to see what the war had done to people. This unique travelogue celebrates an important American character and the indomitable spirit of a nation that was to inspire Cooke's reports and broadcasts for some sixty years

Alistair Cooke, then a Washington correspondent for "The Guardian," recognised a great story to be told in investigating at first hand the effects of the Second World War on America and the daily lives of Americans as they adjusted to radically new circumstances. Within weeks of the Pearl Harbor attack, with a reporter's zeal, Cooke set off on a circuit of the entire country to see what the war had done to people. This unique travelogue celebrates an important American character and the indomitable spirit of a nation that was to inspire Cooke's reports and broadcasts for some sixty years

  • Book of the Week - Lost Cosmonaut

  • Daniel Kalder

"Lost Cosmonaut" documents Daniel Kalder's travels in the bizarre and mysterious worlds of Russia's ethnic republics. Obsessed with a quest he never fully understands, Kalder boldly goes where no man has gone before: in the deserts of Kalmykia, he stumbles upon a city dedicated to chess and a forgotten tribe of Mongols; in Mari El, home to Europe's last pagan nation, he meets the Chief Druid and participates in an ancient rite; while in the bleak industrial badlands of Udmurtia, Kalder looks for Mikhail Kalashnikov, inventor of the AK-47, and accidentally becomes a TV star. Profane yet wise, utterly honest and yet full of lies, "Lost Cosmonaut" is an eye-opening, blackly comic tour of the most alien planet in our cosmos: Earth.

"Lost Cosmonaut" documents Daniel Kalder's travels in the bizarre and mysterious worlds of Russia's ethnic republics. Obsessed with a quest he never fully understands, Kalder boldly goes where no man has gone before: in the deserts of Kalmykia, he stumbles upon a city dedicated to chess and a forgotten tribe of Mongols; in Mari El, home to Europe's last pagan nation, he meets the Chief Druid and participates in an ancient rite; while in the bleak industrial badlands of Udmurtia, Kalder looks for Mikhail Kalashnikov, inventor of the AK-47, and accidentally becomes a TV star. Profane yet wise, utterly honest and yet full of lies, "Lost Cosmonaut" is an eye-opening, blackly comic tour of the most alien planet in our cosmos: Earth.

  • Book of the Week - The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid

  • Bill Bryson

Bill Bryson's first travel book opened with the immortal line, 'I come from Des Moines. Somebody had to.' In his deeply funny new memoir, he travels back in time to explore the ordinary kid he once was, and the curious world of 1950s America. It was a happy time, when almost everything was good for you, including DDT, cigarettes and nuclear fallout. This is a book about growing up in a specific time and place. But in Bryson's hands, it becomes everyone's story, one that will speak volumes - especially to anyone who has ever been young.

Bill Bryson's first travel book opened with the immortal line, 'I come from Des Moines. Somebody had to.' In his deeply funny new memoir, he travels back in time to explore the ordinary kid he once was, and the curious world of 1950s America. It was a happy time, when almost everything was good for you, including DDT, cigarettes and nuclear fallout. This is a book about growing up in a specific time and place. But in Bryson's hands, it becomes everyone's story, one that will speak volumes - especially to anyone who has ever been young.

  • Book of the Week - Utopian Dreams

  • Tobias Jones

This is a travel book, an account of the year Tobias Jones spent living in communes and amongst unusual dreamers. It is his attempt to retreat from the 'real world' - which is making him emptier and angrier by the day - and seek out the alternatives to modern manners and morality.

This is a travel book, an account of the year Tobias Jones spent living in communes and amongst unusual dreamers. It is his attempt to retreat from the 'real world' - which is making him emptier and angrier by the day - and seek out the alternatives to modern manners and morality.

  • Book of the Week - Wildwood: A Journey Through Trees

  • Roger Deakin

From the walnut tree at his Suffolk home, Roger Deakin embarks upon a quest that takes him through Britain, across Europe, to Central Asia and Australia, in search of what lies behind man's profound and enduring connection with wood and with trees. Meeting woodlanders of all kinds, he lives in shacks and cabins, builds hazel benders, and hunts bush-plums with aboriginal women. At once autobiography, history, a traveller's tale and a work of natural history, "Wildwood" is a lyrical and fiercely intimate evocation of the spirit of trees: in nature, in our souls, in our culture, and in our lives.

From the walnut tree at his Suffolk home, Roger Deakin embarks upon a quest that takes him through Britain, across Europe, to Central Asia and Australia, in search of what lies behind man's profound and enduring connection with wood and with trees. Meeting woodlanders of all kinds, he lives in shacks and cabins, builds hazel benders, and hunts bush-plums with aboriginal women. At once autobiography, history, a traveller's tale and a work of natural history, "Wildwood" is a lyrical and fiercely intimate evocation of the spirit of trees: in nature, in our souls, in our culture, and in our lives.

Lars Tharp explores the Chinese porcelain industry. He travels to Jingdezhen, west of Shanghai, the most important city in the maufacture of pocelain for 1,000 years and follows the trail linking Jingdezhen to Britain.

Lars Tharp explores the Chinese porcelain industry. He travels to Jingdezhen, west of Shanghai, the most important city in the maufacture of pocelain for 1,000 years and follows the trail linking Jingdezhen to Britain.

Lars Tharp explores the Chinese porcelain industry. He travels to Jingdezhen, west of Shanghai, the most important city in the maufacture of pocelain for 1,000 years and follows the trail linking Jingdezhen to Britain.

Lars Tharp explores the Chinese porcelain industry. He travels to Jingdezhen, west of Shanghai, the most important city in the maufacture of pocelain for 1,000 years and follows the trail linking Jingdezhen to Britain.

  • Human Alien

  • Sue Nelson

Making A Human Alien reveals how human beings could be made super-human in the name of space exploration. Scientists are already working on new ways to keep humans alive for long periods, far from the Earth. Sue Nelson explores how in order to travel in space we will need to become human aliens.

Making A Human Alien reveals how human beings could be made super-human in the name of space exploration. Scientists are already working on new ways to keep humans alive for long periods, far from the Earth. Sue Nelson explores how in order to travel in space we will need to become human aliens.

As we prepare to return astronauts to the Moon and then ultimately to the next frontier, Mars, Frank Close explores the physical and psychological limitations to human space travel.

As we prepare to return astronauts to the Moon and then ultimately to the next frontier, Mars, Frank Close explores the physical and psychological limitations to human space travel.

In the spring of 1520 six thousand Englishmen and women packed their bags and followed their King across the sea to France. They weren't part of an invasion force but were attendants to King Henry VIII and travelling to take part in the greatest and most conspicuous display of wealth and culture that Europe had ever seen. They were met by Francis I of France and six thousand French noblemen and servants on English soil in Northern France and erected their temporary palaces, elaborate tents, jousting pavilions and golden fountains spewing forth red, white and claret wine in the Val D'Or. For just over two weeks they created a temporary town the size of Norwich, England's second city, on the 'Camp du Drap D'Or', or Field of the Cloth of Gold. What drove the French and the English to create such an extraordinary event? What did the two sides do when they got there, and what - if anything - was achieved?

In the spring of 1520 six thousand Englishmen and women packed their bags and followed their King across the sea to France. They weren't part of an invasion force but were attendants to King Henry VIII and travelling to take part in the greatest and most conspicuous display of wealth and culture that Europe had ever seen. They were met by Francis I of France and six thousand French noblemen and servants on English soil in Northern France and erected their temporary palaces, elaborate tents, jousting pavilions and golden fountains spewing forth red, white and claret wine in the Val D'Or. For just over two weeks they created a temporary town the size of Norwich, England's second city, on the 'Camp du Drap D'Or', or Field of the Cloth of Gold. What drove the French and the English to create such an extraordinary event? What did the two sides do when they got there, and what - if anything - was achieved?