UCL CENTRE FOR LANGUAGES & INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION (CLIE)

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53 items found in the english section!
  • Diary of Lady Murasaki (Penguin Classics)

  • Murasaki Shikibu , Penguin Classics , 1999

The Diary recorded by Lady Murasaki (c. 973-c. 1020), author of The Tale of Genji, is an intimate picture of her life as tutor and companion to the young Empress Shoshi. Told in a series of vignettes, it offers revealing glimpses of the Japanese imperial palace - the auspicious birth of a prince, rivalries between the Emperor's consorts, with sharp criticism of Murasaki's fellow ladies-in-waiting and drunken courtiers, and telling remarks about the timid Empress and her powerful father, Michinaga. The Diary is also a work of great subtlety and intense personal reflection, as Murasaki makes penetrating insights into human psychology - her pragmatic observations always balanced by an exquisite and pensive melancholy.

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The Diary recorded by Lady Murasaki (c. 973-c. 1020), author of The Tale of Genji, is an intimate picture of her life as tutor and companion to the young Empress Shoshi. Told in a series of vignettes, it offers revealing glimpses of the Japanese imperial palace - the auspicious birth of a prince, rivalries between the Emperor's consorts, with sharp criticism of Murasaki's fellow ladies-in-waiting and drunken courtiers, and telling remarks about the timid Empress and her powerful father, Michinaga. The Diary is also a work of great subtlety and intense personal reflection, as Murasaki makes penetrating insights into human psychology - her pragmatic observations always balanced by an exquisite and pensive melancholy.

Pre-sessional lecture 2011

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braincognitive neuroscienceconsciousnessneurologyneurosciencepsychologyscience

Pre-sessional lecture 2011

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GPC/Pre-sessional Lecture 2008

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braincognitive neuroscienceconsciousnessneurologyneurosciencepsychologyscience

GPC/Pre-sessional Lecture 2008

Pre-sessional Lecture 30th July 2019

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anatomyasymmetrybiochemistryembryologyneurosciencepsychology

Pre-sessional Lecture 30th July 2019

Diploma Lecture 2012 - 2013

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languagelinguisticsmemorypsychology

Diploma Lecture 2012 - 2013

Pre-Sessional Lecture 01.05.2018

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languagelinguisticsmemorypsychology

Pre-Sessional Lecture 01.05.2018

Diploma 2010/11

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biologygeneticspsychologysciencesociety

Diploma 2010/11

Diploma 2010

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communicationnon-verbal communicationspsychologysociology

Diploma 2010

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germanyhistorynationalismpoliticspsychology

UPC 2011

Diploma 2014

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historymemoryphilosophypsychology

Diploma 2014

Diploma Lecture 2006-2007

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brainhumanitiesneurologyneurosciencepsychologysciencesynaesthesia

Diploma Lecture 2006-2007

Professor of Genetics Steve Jones challenges evolutionary psychology, the controversial new science of how our brains and minds developed.

Professor of Genetics Steve Jones challenges evolutionary psychology, the controversial new science of how our brains and minds developed.

Professor of Genetics Steve Jones challenges the controversial science of evolutionary psychology. Evolutionary psychologists say human behaviour, such as who we marry, when we have children and even the quality of our sex lives, can be explained by having a Stone Age brain in a 21st century body. Professor Jones examines the scientific evidence for such claims and asks if we should be worried if contentious theories escape the world of science and enter the arena of social policy.

Professor of Genetics Steve Jones challenges the controversial science of evolutionary psychology. Evolutionary psychologists say human behaviour, such as who we marry, when we have children and even the quality of our sex lives, can be explained by having a Stone Age brain in a 21st century body. Professor Jones examines the scientific evidence for such claims and asks if we should be worried if contentious theories escape the world of science and enter the arena of social policy.

We make, we create, we paint, we write, we think we discover and we invent. Humans are endlessly creative. From our ability to utter completely new sentences every time we speak to the artistic and scientific genius of Picasso, Shakespeare or Einstein. Do scientists or psychologists know very much about what creativity actually is, or which bit of our brain is in control when we do? Ian Peacock unravels the myth, science and psychology behind creativity. He also finds out why computers could be the artists and writers of the 22nd century.

We make, we create, we paint, we write, we think we discover and we invent. Humans are endlessly creative. From our ability to utter completely new sentences every time we speak to the artistic and scientific genius of Picasso, Shakespeare or Einstein. Do scientists or psychologists know very much about what creativity actually is, or which bit of our brain is in control when we do? Ian Peacock unravels the myth, science and psychology behind creativity. He also finds out why computers could be the artists and writers of the 22nd century.

Carolyn Quinn examines the psychology of leadership. Once you've secured your position as leader, how do you deal with the demands at the top? The level of media attention across all sectors, from politics to football, means that today's leaders are under more scrutiny than ever before. In the last episode, Carolyn explores the challenges of modern leadership, from stepping up to the top job, to stepping down.

Carolyn Quinn examines the psychology of leadership. Once you've secured your position as leader, how do you deal with the demands at the top? The level of media attention across all sectors, from politics to football, means that today's leaders are under more scrutiny than ever before. In the last episode, Carolyn explores the challenges of modern leadership, from stepping up to the top job, to stepping down.

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With Janet Radcliffe Richards, Reader in Bioethics, University College, London; Nicholas Humphrey, Professor of Psychology, New School for Social Research, New York; Professor Steven Rose, Professor of Physic, Open University.

With Janet Radcliffe Richards, Reader in Bioethics, University College, London; Nicholas Humphrey, Professor of Psychology, New School for Social Research, New York; Professor Steven Rose, Professor of Physic, Open University.

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With Professor Susan Greenfield, director of the Royal Institution, Professor of Pharmacology, Oxford University and Professor of Physics at Gresham College; Professor Vilayanur Ramachandran, Professor of Neuroscience and Psychology, Director of the Brain Perception Laboratory, University of California in San Diego and Professor at the Salk Institute.

With Professor Susan Greenfield, director of the Royal Institution, Professor of Pharmacology, Oxford University and Professor of Physics at Gresham College; Professor Vilayanur Ramachandran, Professor of Neuroscience and Psychology, Director of the Brain Perception Laboratory, University of California in San Diego and Professor at the Salk Institute.

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With Professor Russell Stannard, physicist, religious writer and author of The God Experiment; Andrew Samuels, Jungian analyst and Professor of Analytical Psychology, University of Essex.

With Professor Russell Stannard, physicist, religious writer and author of The God Experiment; Andrew Samuels, Jungian analyst and Professor of Analytical Psychology, University of Essex.

A reaction against Romanticism, the realist novel presented life as it was in urbanized, industrial Britain. Attacked as ordinary, mundane, overly democratic and lacking the imaginative demands of poetry, its defendants argued that the ordinariness of life contained a complexity and depth previously unseen and unconsidered. At its best the realist novel was like life itself - complex in appearance, rich in character, diverse in outlook, teeming with ideas and operating on several levels. It was a forum for the confusions of the Victorian age over Christianity and Darwinism, economics, morality and psychology, yet it was also a domestic novel concerned with the individuality of human relationships.

A reaction against Romanticism, the realist novel presented life as it was in urbanized, industrial Britain. Attacked as ordinary, mundane, overly democratic and lacking the imaginative demands of poetry, its defendants argued that the ordinariness of life contained a complexity and depth previously unseen and unconsidered. At its best the realist novel was like life itself - complex in appearance, rich in character, diverse in outlook, teeming with ideas and operating on several levels. It was a forum for the confusions of the Victorian age over Christianity and Darwinism, economics, morality and psychology, yet it was also a domestic novel concerned with the individuality of human relationships.

  • Reading Skills for the Social Sciences

  • Louann Haarman, Patrick Leech & Janet Murray , Oxford University Press , 1988

The aim of this book is to help improve the reading skills of intermediate students of English who need those skills for social science disciplines at university. The texts used in the book are chosen from a wide range of social science disciplines such as politics, psychology, history, sociology and economics.

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The aim of this book is to help improve the reading skills of intermediate students of English who need those skills for social science disciplines at university. The texts used in the book are chosen from a wide range of social science disciplines such as politics, psychology, history, sociology and economics.

  • English for Psychology in Higher Education Studies (Teacher's Book)

  • Jane Short , Garnet , 2010

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  • English for Psychology in Higher Education Studies Course Book

  • Jane Short , Garnet , 2010

"English for Psychology is a skills-based course designed specifically for students of psychology who are about to enter English-medium tertiary level studies.

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audio

"English for Psychology is a skills-based course designed specifically for students of psychology who are about to enter English-medium tertiary level studies.

  • Genius of the Modern World

  • BBC

Historian Bettany Hughes retraces the lives of three great thinkers whose ideas shaped the modern world - Karl Marx, Frederick Nietzsche and Sigmund Freud.

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freudideologymarxmarxismnietzchephilosopherphilosophypsychoanalysispsychology

Historian Bettany Hughes retraces the lives of three great thinkers whose ideas shaped the modern world - Karl Marx, Frederick Nietzsche and Sigmund Freud.

Bettany Hughes travels to Vienna on the trail of Sigmund Freud, the father of psychoanalysis. Freud's influence surrounds us. In our vocabulary - repression, penis envy, the Freudian slip - and in the freedom we take for granted, to talk openly about our deepest feelings and insecurities

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freudpsychoanalysispsychology

Bettany Hughes travels to Vienna on the trail of Sigmund Freud, the father of psychoanalysis. Freud's influence surrounds us. In our vocabulary - repression, penis envy, the Freudian slip - and in the freedom we take for granted, to talk openly about our deepest feelings and insecurities

It is a feeling we all know - the moment when a light goes on in your head. In a sudden flash of inspiration, a new idea is born.

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creativitymedical scienceneuroimagingneurology

It is a feeling we all know - the moment when a light goes on in your head. In a sudden flash of inspiration, a new idea is born.

In this programme, Michael Mosley delves into the BBC archives to chart scientists' progress as they probed the mind of the murderer to try to understand why people kill, and to find out whether by understanding murder we can prevent it.

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braincrimepsychologyscience

In this programme, Michael Mosley delves into the BBC archives to chart scientists' progress as they probed the mind of the murderer to try to understand why people kill, and to find out whether by understanding murder we can prevent it.

They are the miracle pills that shouldn\'t really work at all. Placebos come in all shapes and sizes, but they contain no active ingredient. Now they are being shown to help treat pain, depression and even alleviate some of the symptoms of Parkinson\'s disease. Horizon explores why they work, and how we could all benefit from the hidden power of the placebo.

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chemistrymedical sciencesplacebopsychologyscience

They are the miracle pills that shouldn\'t really work at all. Placebos come in all shapes and sizes, but they contain no active ingredient. Now they are being shown to help treat pain, depression and even alleviate some of the symptoms of Parkinson\'s disease. Horizon explores why they work, and how we could all benefit from the hidden power of the placebo.

Horizon uncovers the secret world of our dreams. In a series of cutting-edge experiments and personal stories, we go in search of the science behind this most enduring mystery and ask: where do dreams come from? Do they have meaning? And ultimately, why do we dream?

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braindreamsmedical sciencesneurologypsychology

Horizon uncovers the secret world of our dreams. In a series of cutting-edge experiments and personal stories, we go in search of the science behind this most enduring mystery and ask: where do dreams come from? Do they have meaning? And ultimately, why do we dream?

Documentary about Nim Chimpsky, the chimpanzee who in the 1970s became the focus of a landmark experiment which aimed to show that an ape could learn to communicate with language if raised and nurtured like a human child. Following Nim's extraordinary journey through human society, and the enduring impact he makes on the people he meets along the way, the film is an unflinching and unsentimental biography of an animal we tried to make human.

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animalschimpanzeesexperimentsociety

Documentary about Nim Chimpsky, the chimpanzee who in the 1970s became the focus of a landmark experiment which aimed to show that an ape could learn to communicate with language if raised and nurtured like a human child. Following Nim's extraordinary journey through human society, and the enduring impact he makes on the people he meets along the way, the film is an unflinching and unsentimental biography of an animal we tried to make human.

The world's most famous living scientist talks exclusively about people's right to end their own lives if they are in great pain with no prospect of relief. He talks about the time doctors proposed turning off his life support machine and the need to protect vulnerable people. He also talks about his own thoughts on suicide.

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healthpsychologypublic healthstephen hawkingsuicide

The world's most famous living scientist talks exclusively about people's right to end their own lives if they are in great pain with no prospect of relief. He talks about the time doctors proposed turning off his life support machine and the need to protect vulnerable people. He also talks about his own thoughts on suicide.