UCL CENTRE FOR LANGUAGES & INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION (CLIE)

Loading. Please wait.
190 items found in the english section!
  • Market Leader - Business Law

  • Tricia Smith , Longman , 2000

This book focuses on reading skills and vocabulary development necessary for students specialising in business law

2501

This book focuses on reading skills and vocabulary development necessary for students specialising in business law

  • Market Leader - Business Law

  • A Robin Widdowson , Pearson Longman , 2010

"Business Law" is ideal for students who need to learn the language of more specialised areas of business English, focusing on the reading skills and vocabulary development required for business law.

104722

"Business Law" is ideal for students who need to learn the language of more specialised areas of business English, focusing on the reading skills and vocabulary development required for business law.

  • Professional English in Use - Law

  • Gillian D. Brown & Sally Rice , Cambridge University Press , 2007

Topics include corporate and commercial law, liability, contract law and intellectual property. The book also introduces general legal vocabulary related to legal systems, the legal professions and the skills lawyers need in their daily working lives. Primarily designed as a self-study reference and practice book, it can also be used for classroom work and one-to-one lessons.

5940

Topics include corporate and commercial law, liability, contract law and intellectual property. The book also introduces general legal vocabulary related to legal systems, the legal professions and the skills lawyers need in their daily working lives. Primarily designed as a self-study reference and practice book, it can also be used for classroom work and one-to-one lessons.

  • Test Your Professional English - Law

  • Nick Brieger , Penguin Books Ltd , 2002

This book tests the student's knowledge of the basic legal concepts, key words and essential expressions needed to communicate effectively and confidently, and aids in developing a specialist vocabulary

335

This book tests the student's knowledge of the basic legal concepts, key words and essential expressions needed to communicate effectively and confidently, and aids in developing a specialist vocabulary

  • The Chambers Student Guide 2008

  • Anna Williams , Chambers , 2008

An Independent guide for students choosing a career in Law.

7867

An Independent guide for students choosing a career in Law.

  • Tourism Law

  • J Corke , ELM Publications , 1998

This book gives a detailed description of the history and cases that shaped British tourism law as it is today

1811

This book gives a detailed description of the history and cases that shaped British tourism law as it is today

  • Book of the Week - England's Mistress: The Infamous Life of Emma Hamilton

  • Kate Williams

A dramatic, sparkling tale of sex, glamour, intrigue, romance and heartbreak, "England's Mistress" traces the rise and rise of the gorgeous Emma Hamilton. Born into poverty, she clawed her way up through London's underworlds of sex for sale to become England's first media superstar.

A dramatic, sparkling tale of sex, glamour, intrigue, romance and heartbreak, "England's Mistress" traces the rise and rise of the gorgeous Emma Hamilton. Born into poverty, she clawed her way up through London's underworlds of sex for sale to become England's first media superstar.

  • Book of the Week - Love and Louis XIV

  • Antonia Fraser

Mistresses and wives, mothers and daughters - Antonia Fraser brilliantly explores the relationships which existed between The Sun King and the women in his life. This includes not only Louis XIV's mistresses, principally Louise de La Valliere, Athenais de Montespan, and the puritanical Madame de Maintenon, but also the wider story of his relationships with women in general, including his mother Anne of Austria, his two sisters-in-law who were Duchesses d'Orleans in succession, Henriette-Anne and Liselotte, his wayward illegitimate daughters, and lastly Adelaide, the beloved child-wife of his grandson.

Mistresses and wives, mothers and daughters - Antonia Fraser brilliantly explores the relationships which existed between The Sun King and the women in his life. This includes not only Louis XIV's mistresses, principally Louise de La Valliere, Athenais de Montespan, and the puritanical Madame de Maintenon, but also the wider story of his relationships with women in general, including his mother Anne of Austria, his two sisters-in-law who were Duchesses d'Orleans in succession, Henriette-Anne and Liselotte, his wayward illegitimate daughters, and lastly Adelaide, the beloved child-wife of his grandson.

  • Book of the Week - Someone Like Me: Tales from a Borrowed Childhood

  • Miles Kington

Beloved broadcaster and writer Miles Kington's account of an endearingly eccentric childhood has everything - a lovable narrator, a mother who is constantly on her deathbed, a gadget-obsessed father and a flamboyantly theatrical older brother. SOMEONE LIKE ME is a collection of enchanting musings on life from the fringes of a sometimes roundabout, often perplexing but always entertaining adult world in which the incidents and accidents of dog training, borrowed lawnmowers, badminton, figs and unlikely brushes with the Catholic Church combine in the most original and laugh-out-loud funny book you'll have read in decades.

Beloved broadcaster and writer Miles Kington's account of an endearingly eccentric childhood has everything - a lovable narrator, a mother who is constantly on her deathbed, a gadget-obsessed father and a flamboyantly theatrical older brother. SOMEONE LIKE ME is a collection of enchanting musings on life from the fringes of a sometimes roundabout, often perplexing but always entertaining adult world in which the incidents and accidents of dog training, borrowed lawnmowers, badminton, figs and unlikely brushes with the Catholic Church combine in the most original and laugh-out-loud funny book you'll have read in decades.

Venerated as one of the most important science fiction writers today, Brian Aldiss discusses his latest work with Mark Lawson.

Venerated as one of the most important science fiction writers today, Brian Aldiss discusses his latest work with Mark Lawson.

Mark Lawson interviews David Lodge who's new novel Author, Author journeys back to the 1880s to explore Henry James' middle years...

Mark Lawson interviews David Lodge who's new novel Author, Author journeys back to the 1880s to explore Henry James' middle years...

Harold Pinter has won the Nobel Prize for Literature. Listen to a special profile and to a full length Interview with Pinter.

Harold Pinter has won the Nobel Prize for Literature. Listen to a special profile and to a full length Interview with Pinter.

Author, Joanna Trollope talks to Francine about her latest novel Brother and Sister which looks at on the effect of adoption on several generations.

Author, Joanna Trollope talks to Francine about her latest novel Brother and Sister which looks at on the effect of adoption on several generations.

In a special edition of Front Row, Mark Lawson talks in a rare extended interview to writer John le Carré. As his latest book Absolute Friends is published, le Carré looks back at his childhood and his relationship with his father. He explains how his work for the British foreign service has influenced his writing and reflects on the current international political situation.

In a special edition of Front Row, Mark Lawson talks in a rare extended interview to writer John le Carré. As his latest book Absolute Friends is published, le Carré looks back at his childhood and his relationship with his father. He explains how his work for the British foreign service has influenced his writing and reflects on the current international political situation.

Mark Lawson talks to Barnes in his London home about his writing career, why his Who's Who entry is so enigmatically brief, and why he shrugs off the label of Francophile despite an enduring attraction to all things French.

Mark Lawson talks to Barnes in his London home about his writing career, why his Who's Who entry is so enigmatically brief, and why he shrugs off the label of Francophile despite an enduring attraction to all things French.

Mark Lawson talks to Minette Walters on winning the 2003 Gold Dagger Award for the best crime novel.

Mark Lawson talks to Minette Walters on winning the 2003 Gold Dagger Award for the best crime novel.

Dame Muriel Spark talks to Mark Lawson at her home in Tuscany about her disastrous teenage marriage, the boyfriend who tried to sell her back her own letters and her conversion to Catholicism.

Dame Muriel Spark talks to Mark Lawson at her home in Tuscany about her disastrous teenage marriage, the boyfriend who tried to sell her back her own letters and her conversion to Catholicism.

Mark Lawson talks to comedian Ricky Gervais about the second series of the award winning BBC TWO comedy, The Office.

Mark Lawson talks to comedian Ricky Gervais about the second series of the award winning BBC TWO comedy, The Office.

Robert Hughes, art critic and author of a new book Goya, explains to Mark Lawson how the artist changed art forever.

Robert Hughes, art critic and author of a new book Goya, explains to Mark Lawson how the artist changed art forever.

John Wilson speaks with crime novelist and activist Walter Mosley, famously Bill Clinton's favourite author, of The Devil In A Blue Dress.

John Wilson speaks with crime novelist and activist Walter Mosley, famously Bill Clinton's favourite author, of The Devil In A Blue Dress.

In Moscow's Tretyakov Gallery hangs perhaps the most well-known picture of Russia's most well-known ruler. Dimitri Levitsky's 1780 'Portrait of Catherine the Great in the Justice Temple' depicts Catherine in the temple burning poppies at an altar, symbolising her sacrifice of self-interest for Russia. Law books and the scales of justice are at her feet, highlighting her respectful promotion of the rule of law. But menacingly, in the background an eagle crouches, suggesting the means to use brutal power where necessary. This was one of many images that Catherine commissioned that demonstrated her skill at manipulation and reinvention.

In Moscow's Tretyakov Gallery hangs perhaps the most well-known picture of Russia's most well-known ruler. Dimitri Levitsky's 1780 'Portrait of Catherine the Great in the Justice Temple' depicts Catherine in the temple burning poppies at an altar, symbolising her sacrifice of self-interest for Russia. Law books and the scales of justice are at her feet, highlighting her respectful promotion of the rule of law. But menacingly, in the background an eagle crouches, suggesting the means to use brutal power where necessary. This was one of many images that Catherine commissioned that demonstrated her skill at manipulation and reinvention.

With Mark Buchanan, physicist and author of Ubiquity; Professor Frank Close, theoretical physicist and author of Lucifer’s Legacy: The Meaning of Asymmetry; Nancy Cartwright, Professor of Philosophy, LSE.

With Mark Buchanan, physicist and author of Ubiquity; Professor Frank Close, theoretical physicist and author of Lucifer’s Legacy: The Meaning of Asymmetry; Nancy Cartwright, Professor of Philosophy, LSE.

These are the three laws of motion with which Newton founded the discipline of classical mechanics and conjoined a series of concepts - inertia, acceleration, force, momentum and mass - by which we still describe the movement of things today. Newton’s laws have been refined over the years – most famously by Einstein - but they were still good enough, 282 years after they were published, to put Neil Armstrong on the Moon.

These are the three laws of motion with which Newton founded the discipline of classical mechanics and conjoined a series of concepts - inertia, acceleration, force, momentum and mass - by which we still describe the movement of things today. Newton’s laws have been refined over the years – most famously by Einstein - but they were still good enough, 282 years after they were published, to put Neil Armstrong on the Moon.

First of two programmes which go behind the elegant facades of legal London to meet the barristers, clerks and staff of Outer Temple Chambers, one of London's leading law chambers, as they prepare for the biggest upheaval in their history: the full implementation of the 2007 Legal Services Act. Due to be fully implemented in 2012, the Act will produce greater competition in who can provide legal services. Many of the cosy arrangements of the past will be swept away, and barristers will need to show that they can provide the service and value for money that the public wants.

First of two programmes which go behind the elegant facades of legal London to meet the barristers, clerks and staff of Outer Temple Chambers, one of London's leading law chambers, as they prepare for the biggest upheaval in their history: the full implementation of the 2007 Legal Services Act. Due to be fully implemented in 2012, the Act will produce greater competition in who can provide legal services. Many of the cosy arrangements of the past will be swept away, and barristers will need to show that they can provide the service and value for money that the public wants.

Second of two programmes which go behind the elegant facades of legal London to meet the barristers, clerks and staff of Outer Temple Chambers, one of London's leading law chambers.

Second of two programmes which go behind the elegant facades of legal London to meet the barristers, clerks and staff of Outer Temple Chambers, one of London's leading law chambers.

pdf

This lecture examines how difficult it can be to tell friend from foe in a climate of fear. Organisations that are set up to overthrow dictatorships can themselves turn into tyrannical regimes. Liberation movements may be forced to seek help from dangerous quarters. And these days it is not just countries that control and direct the lives of their citizens. When the rule of law breaks down, shadowy forces set themselves up as "quasi-states" - and these, more than anything else, have produced today's climate of fear

This lecture examines how difficult it can be to tell friend from foe in a climate of fear. Organisations that are set up to overthrow dictatorships can themselves turn into tyrannical regimes. Liberation movements may be forced to seek help from dangerous quarters. And these days it is not just countries that control and direct the lives of their citizens. When the rule of law breaks down, shadowy forces set themselves up as "quasi-states" - and these, more than anything else, have produced today's climate of fear

Professor Amanda Vickery presents dramatised extracts from gripping Old Bailey court cases from the 18th century and discusses with fellow historians what they reveal about the period. In episode 1, Amanda Vickery listens to the voices of 18th-century highwaymen.

Professor Amanda Vickery presents dramatised extracts from gripping Old Bailey court cases from the 18th century and discusses with fellow historians what they reveal about the period. In episode 1, Amanda Vickery listens to the voices of 18th-century highwaymen.

Professor Amanda Vickery presents dramatised extracts from gripping Old Bailey court cases from the 18th century and discusses with fellow historians what they reveal about the period. In episode 2, Amanda Vickery listens to the voices of criminal women in the Old Bailey.

Professor Amanda Vickery presents dramatised extracts from gripping Old Bailey court cases from the 18th century and discusses with fellow historians what they reveal about the period. In episode 2, Amanda Vickery listens to the voices of criminal women in the Old Bailey.

Professor Amanda Vickery presents dramatised extracts from gripping Old Bailey court cases from the 18th century and discusses with fellow historians what they reveal about the period. In episode 3, Amanda Vickery listens to the voices of young children who found themselves in court.

Professor Amanda Vickery presents dramatised extracts from gripping Old Bailey court cases from the 18th century and discusses with fellow historians what they reveal about the period. In episode 3, Amanda Vickery listens to the voices of young children who found themselves in court.

Professor Amanda Vickery presents dramatised extracts from gripping Old Bailey court cases from the 18th century and discusses with fellow historians what they reveal about the period. In episode 4, Amanda Vickery listens to the voices of conmen and street fighters in the 18th century.

Professor Amanda Vickery presents dramatised extracts from gripping Old Bailey court cases from the 18th century and discusses with fellow historians what they reveal about the period. In episode 4, Amanda Vickery listens to the voices of conmen and street fighters in the 18th century.