UCL CENTRE FOR LANGUAGES & INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION (CLIE)

376 items found in the english section!



David Attenborough
Mammals\' ability to learn new tricks is the key to survival in the knife-edge world of hunters and hunted. In a TV first, a killer whale off the Falklands does something unique: it sneaks into a pool where elephant seal pups learn to swim and snatches them, saving itself the trouble of hunting in the open sea.
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attenboroughbiologylifemammalsnatural worldnaturescience
BBC
There are 200 million insects for each of us. They are the most successful animal group ever. Their key is an armoured covering that takes on almost any shape.
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attenboroughbiologylifenatural worldnaturescience
David Attenborough
Plants\' solutions to life\'s challenges are as ingenious and manipulative as any animal\'s.
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attenboroughlifenatural worldnatureplantsscience
David Attenborough
Primates are just like us - intelligent, quarrelsome, family-centred.
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attenboroughlifenatural worldnatureprimatesscience
BBC 1
The final programme covers the most ancient of the reptiles: the crocodiles and turtles. In the Galápagos Islands, among the giant tortoises, Attenborough explains how the creatures came to develop their shells as a defence against predators.
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attenboroughbiologylifenatural worldnaturereptilesscience
BBC 1
The fourth episode focuses on the most modern reptiles, the snakes, exploring how they have managed to become successful despite their elongated body shape. Attenborough explains how they evolved from underground burrowers to surface hunters, losing their limbs in the process.
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attenboroughbiologylifenatural worldnaturescience
David Attenborough
The extraordinary and intimate lives of the soft-skinned amphibians. Marsupial frogs where the father carries his young in pouches, giant metre-long salamanders staging wrestling matches and newts that display just like birds of paradise.
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attenboroughbiologylifenatural worldnaturescience
Alastair Fothergill
Documentary about the wildlife in Antarctica. In September, spring begins, and the programme follows the activities of elephant seals, albatross, penguins, crab-eater seals and snow petrels. Second in the series
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antarcticattenboroughbiologylifenatural historynatural worldnaturescience
Alastair Fothergill
About wildlife in Antarctica in the middle of winter. Weddell seals maintain holes in the ice for access to food and shelter from the worst storms. Fish hide in the ice relying on their own natural anti-freeze to stop ice crystals growing in their tissues. Emperor penguins huddle together in groups to incubate a single egg. Fifth in the series
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antarcticattenboroughbiologylifenatural historynatural worldnaturescience
Alastair Fothergill
David Attenborough visits Captain Scott's abandoned hut in Antarctica and recounts the epic story of his struggle to be the first human being to stand at the South Pole. Now there is a permanent settlement of scientists. He explains the techniques, both old and new, used to capture the images used in "Life in the Freezer." Sixth in the series
3631
antarcticattenboroughbiologylifenatural historynatural worldnaturescience
BBC
David Attenborough's now legendary encounter with young gorillas is featured in this episode as he looks at the history of primates, whose ancestors sought their fortune in the treetops. There they developed binocular vision for accurately judging distances, and the ability to grasp trees with a firm grip. The group includes dazzling gymnasts, deafening choristers and highly cultured monkeys.
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attenboroughbiologyearthlifenatural historynatural worldnaturescience
BBC
Bright blue starfish, crimson feather stars, shell-less snails in designs as extravagant as any Paris fashion show, shrimps of every colour, others that are transparent - just a sample of the animal wonders to be found in a small area of the Great Barrier Reef.
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attenboroughbiologyearthlifenatural historynatural worldnaturescience
BBC
Fish occur in populations of billions and there are over 30,000 species, more than in any other group of backboned animals. The development of the backbone was a crucial advance in evolution -and it probably came from a most unlikely source, a little jelly-like creature called a sea squirt.
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attenboroughbiologyearthlifenatural historynatural worldnaturescience