UCL CENTRE FOR LANGUAGES & INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION (CLIE)

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181 items found in the english section!
  • Three Great Plays of Shakespeare (Penguin Readers 4)

  • Karen Holmes, Andy Hopkins & Jocelyn Potter , Penguin , 2000

These are three of Shakespeare's greatest, and most tragic, plays. In each story, the main characters die - cruel Macbeth, unhappy King Lear and the doomed lovers, Romeo and Juliet. They die because they, or others, are weak, greedy or very foolish. But, like real people, they have good qualities and moments of greatness too.

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These are three of Shakespeare's greatest, and most tragic, plays. In each story, the main characters die - cruel Macbeth, unhappy King Lear and the doomed lovers, Romeo and Juliet. They die because they, or others, are weak, greedy or very foolish. But, like real people, they have good qualities and moments of greatness too.

  • Vanity Fair (Penguin Readers 3)

  • William Makepeace Thackeray , Penguin , 2000

Becky Sharp works at a school for young ladies until, at the age of seventeen, she is given a job as a governess. Her friend Amelia comes from a rich family and is in love with an army officer. Becky has no family and no money, but she is a very strong young woman. What will the future hold for these two friends? Will they marry well and be happy? Or will life be unkind to them?

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Becky Sharp works at a school for young ladies until, at the age of seventeen, she is given a job as a governess. Her friend Amelia comes from a rich family and is in love with an army officer. Becky has no family and no money, but she is a very strong young woman. What will the future hold for these two friends? Will they marry well and be happy? Or will life be unkind to them?

  • Windows of the Mind (Cambridge English Readers 5)

  • Frank Brenna , Cambridge University Press , 2001

Each of these stories centres around one of the five senses. We meet a well-known broadcaster whose blindness is her power, a war hero who hates noise and wants silence, a wine-taster who has an accident, a university lecturer who learns Tai Chi, and a magazine journalist who smells scandal and will do anything for a good story

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Each of these stories centres around one of the five senses. We meet a well-known broadcaster whose blindness is her power, a war hero who hates noise and wants silence, a wine-taster who has an accident, a university lecturer who learns Tai Chi, and a magazine journalist who smells scandal and will do anything for a good story

  • Abstract Art

  • Prof. John Aiken

Diploma Lecture 2008

7776
abstract artarthistory of art

Diploma Lecture 2008

  • Adventures in Realism

  • Dr Beaumont

UPCH 2011

5449
arthistory of artliteraturepaintingrealism

UPCH 2011

  • Art as a Journey - Going Nowhere Deliberately

  • Simon Faithfull

Diploma Lecture 2013

109073
artcontemporary arthistory of arttravel

Diploma Lecture 2013

  • Artist as Teacher

  • Phyllida Barlow

Pre-sessional Lecture 2006

1928
arteducationhistory of art

Pre-sessional Lecture 2006

  • Eating Qi: Food, Identity and Inheritance

  • Vivienne Lo

Diploma 2011

105980
antrophologychinachinese medicineculturefoodhealthnutrition

Diploma 2011

  • Modern Art (with transcript)

  • Prof John Aiken
pdf

Diploma Lecture 5 2005-2006

586
arthistory of artmodern art

Diploma Lecture 5 2005-2006

  • Multicultural London

  • Carl Ridler

Diploma Lecture 2011

105650
britaincultureimmigrationlondonmigrationmulticultural societypoliticspublic policysocietysociology

Diploma Lecture 2011

  • Museum Curating (with transcript)

  • Dr Suzanne Keene
pdf

GPC Lecture 2005 TO BE REMOVED ?

1737
curatingmuseum studiesmuseums

GPC Lecture 2005 TO BE REMOVED ?

  • Policy Challenges in an Ageing World

  • James Banks

Pre-Sessional 2009

8618
demographicshealthhealth expectancypolicy challengespoliticspublic healthpublic policy

Pre-Sessional 2009

  • Sounds Familiar? British English accents and dialects at the British Library

  • Dr Jonnie Robinson

Diploma Lecture 2012

107344
english languagelanguagelinguisticspronunciation

Diploma Lecture 2012

  • Swearing in a Foreign Language: The Multicultural Dimension of Rudeness (with transcript)

  • Marco Federighi
pdf

GPC/Pre-sessional Lecture 2008

4268
cultureglobalizationhumanitieslanguagelinguisticssocietysociologyswearing

GPC/Pre-sessional Lecture 2008

  • The English Countryside

  • Professor Munton

Diiploma Lecture 2012

107568
agriculturebritish countrysidecountrysideculturehistoryindustrializationlandscapesocietyurbanization

Diiploma Lecture 2012

  • The French New Wave

  • Roland-François Lack

Diploma 2008

5443
artfilmfilm studiesfrancefrench new wavehistory of artnew wave

Diploma 2008

  • Critical Voices - Literary Criticism in the Twentieth Century

  • BBC English , BBC Books

Critical Voices is a two cassette pack,containing twelve 15 minute programmes.

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Critical Voices is a two cassette pack,containing twelve 15 minute programmes.

  • Book of the Week - I Was Vermeer

  • Frank Wynne

In 1945, a small-time Dutch art dealer was arrested for selling a forgery of a priceless national treasure - a painting by Vermeer - to Hitler's right-hand man. The charge was treason, the only possible sentence death. And yet Han van Meegeren languished in his dank prison cell, incapable of uttering the words that would set him free: 'I am a forger.' This riveting account of greed, hubris, excess, treason and fine art is the story of a failed artist and the greatest forger of all time, who executed a swindle which earned him the equivalent of fifty million dollars and the acclaim of the very critics who had mocked him.

In 1945, a small-time Dutch art dealer was arrested for selling a forgery of a priceless national treasure - a painting by Vermeer - to Hitler's right-hand man. The charge was treason, the only possible sentence death. And yet Han van Meegeren languished in his dank prison cell, incapable of uttering the words that would set him free: 'I am a forger.' This riveting account of greed, hubris, excess, treason and fine art is the story of a failed artist and the greatest forger of all time, who executed a swindle which earned him the equivalent of fifty million dollars and the acclaim of the very critics who had mocked him.

  • Book of the Week - Leni - The Life and Work of Leni Riefenstahl

  • Steven Bach

The definitive biography of Leni Riefenstahl, the woman best known as "Hitler's filmmaker," one of the most fascinating and controversial personalities of the twentieth century. It is the story of huge talent and huger ambition, one that probes the sometimes blurred borders dividing art and beauty from truth and humanity

The definitive biography of Leni Riefenstahl, the woman best known as "Hitler's filmmaker," one of the most fascinating and controversial personalities of the twentieth century. It is the story of huge talent and huger ambition, one that probes the sometimes blurred borders dividing art and beauty from truth and humanity

  • Great Lives - William Hogarth

  • Ian Hislop

Eighteenth-century satirist and painter William Hogarth is nominated by Private Eye editor Ian Hislop. The art historian Andrew Graham-Dixon joins the discussion.

Eighteenth-century satirist and painter William Hogarth is nominated by Private Eye editor Ian Hislop. The art historian Andrew Graham-Dixon joins the discussion.

  • In Our Time - The Artist

  • Melvyn Bragg
pdf

With Emma Barker, Lecturer in Art History, The Open University; Thomas Healy, Professor of Renaissance Studies at Birkbeck University of London; Tim Blanning, Professor of Modern European History at the University of Cambridge.

With Emma Barker, Lecturer in Art History, The Open University; Thomas Healy, Professor of Renaissance Studies at Birkbeck University of London; Tim Blanning, Professor of Modern European History at the University of Cambridge.

  • In Our Time - The Baroque

  • Melvyn Bragg

Melvyn Bragg discusses the Baroque - a term used to describe a vast array of painting, music, architecture and sculpture from the 17th and 18th centuries. His guests this week are Tim Blanning, Professor of Modern European History and Fellow of Sidney Sussex College, University of Cambridge; Nigel Aston, Reader in Early Modern History at the University of Leicester; and Helen Hills, Professor of Art History at the University of York

Melvyn Bragg discusses the Baroque - a term used to describe a vast array of painting, music, architecture and sculpture from the 17th and 18th centuries. His guests this week are Tim Blanning, Professor of Modern European History and Fellow of Sidney Sussex College, University of Cambridge; Nigel Aston, Reader in Early Modern History at the University of Leicester; and Helen Hills, Professor of Art History at the University of York

  • In Our Time - The Music of the Spheres

  • Melvyn Bragg

Melvyn Bragg considers the celestial harmonies of the planets, a Pythagorean concept which fascinated astrologists, artists and mathematicians for centuries. He is joined by Peter Forshaw, Postdoctoral Fellow at Birkbeck, University of London

Melvyn Bragg considers the celestial harmonies of the planets, a Pythagorean concept which fascinated astrologists, artists and mathematicians for centuries. He is joined by Peter Forshaw, Postdoctoral Fellow at Birkbeck, University of London

  • In Our Time -The School of Athens

  • Melvyn Bragg

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss The School of Athens – the fresco painted by the Italian Renaissance painter, Raphael, for Pope Julius II’s private library in the Vatican. The fresco depicts some of the most famous philosophers of ancient times, including Aristotle and Plato, engaged in discussion amidst the splendour of a classical Renaissance chamber. It is considered to be one of the greatest images in Western art not only because of Raphael’s skill as a painter, but also his ability to have created an enduring image that continues to inspire philosophical debate today. Raphael captured something essential about the philosophies of these two men, but he also revealed much about his own time. That such a pagan pair could be found beside a Pope in private tells of the complexity of intellectual life at the time when classical learning was reborn in what we now call the Renaissance. With Angie Hobbs, Associate Professor in Philosophy at the University of Warwick; Valery Rees, Renaissance scholar and senior member of the Language Department at the School of Economic Science; Jill Kraye, Professor of the History of Renaissance Philosophy and Librarian at the Warburg Institute at the University of London

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss The School of Athens – the fresco painted by the Italian Renaissance painter, Raphael, for Pope Julius II’s private library in the Vatican. The fresco depicts some of the most famous philosophers of ancient times, including Aristotle and Plato, engaged in discussion amidst the splendour of a classical Renaissance chamber. It is considered to be one of the greatest images in Western art not only because of Raphael’s skill as a painter, but also his ability to have created an enduring image that continues to inspire philosophical debate today. Raphael captured something essential about the philosophies of these two men, but he also revealed much about his own time. That such a pagan pair could be found beside a Pope in private tells of the complexity of intellectual life at the time when classical learning was reborn in what we now call the Renaissance. With Angie Hobbs, Associate Professor in Philosophy at the University of Warwick; Valery Rees, Renaissance scholar and senior member of the Language Department at the School of Economic Science; Jill Kraye, Professor of the History of Renaissance Philosophy and Librarian at the Warburg Institute at the University of London

  • Rebel Without A Cause – The James Dean Story

  • Johnny Depp

James Dean is the eternal youthful rebel - the movie idol blessed with the looks, style, talent and attitude that captivated a generation. To mark the 50th anniversary of his death at the wheel of his Porsche on September 30 1955, Johnny Depp presents this profile of one of Hollywood's most popular icons.

James Dean is the eternal youthful rebel - the movie idol blessed with the looks, style, talent and attitude that captivated a generation. To mark the 50th anniversary of his death at the wheel of his Porsche on September 30 1955, Johnny Depp presents this profile of one of Hollywood's most popular icons.

  • Relatively Einstein - 01 Uncertain History

  • Radio 4

A hundred years on from Albert Einstein's 'miracle year' of 1905, Radio 4 talks to writers and artists who have wrestled with the scientific legacy of modern physics in their work. Michael Frayn's acclaimed stage play, Copenhagen, opened at the National Theatre in 1998. The story of a meeting between two theoretical physicists during the early years of Second World War, it's been hailed as the most successful use of science on the stage.

A hundred years on from Albert Einstein's 'miracle year' of 1905, Radio 4 talks to writers and artists who have wrestled with the scientific legacy of modern physics in their work. Michael Frayn's acclaimed stage play, Copenhagen, opened at the National Theatre in 1998. The story of a meeting between two theoretical physicists during the early years of Second World War, it's been hailed as the most successful use of science on the stage.

  • Relatively Einstein - 03 Fantasy Physics

  • Radio 4

With the help of fellow author and mathematician Ian Stewart, Pratchett explains his love of science, his fascination with Einstein and the science behind the fantasy world he's created and sold to more than 20 countries worldwide. "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic" said Arthur C Clarke decades ago and it holds true today. Just try and explain how your mobile phone or dvd player works. With the help of fellow author and mathematician Ian Stewart, Pratchett explains his love of science, his fascination with Einstein and the science behind the fantasy world he's created and sold to more than 20 countries worldwide.

With the help of fellow author and mathematician Ian Stewart, Pratchett explains his love of science, his fascination with Einstein and the science behind the fantasy world he's created and sold to more than 20 countries worldwide. "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic" said Arthur C Clarke decades ago and it holds true today. Just try and explain how your mobile phone or dvd player works. With the help of fellow author and mathematician Ian Stewart, Pratchett explains his love of science, his fascination with Einstein and the science behind the fantasy world he's created and sold to more than 20 countries worldwide.

  • Relatively Einstein - 04 Theoretically Funny

  • Radio 4

Comedian Mark Steel has delved into the great man's life and found a great deal to laugh about, if only in theory. "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe." (AE). One doesn't normally associate humour with physics but Einstein has proved the exception, at least for two artists. The first is New Yorker Sid Harris who's been churning out science cartoons for reputable journals since the late sixties.Comedian Mark Steel has delved into the great man's life and found a great deal to laugh about, if only in theory.

Comedian Mark Steel has delved into the great man's life and found a great deal to laugh about, if only in theory. "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe." (AE). One doesn't normally associate humour with physics but Einstein has proved the exception, at least for two artists. The first is New Yorker Sid Harris who's been churning out science cartoons for reputable journals since the late sixties.Comedian Mark Steel has delved into the great man's life and found a great deal to laugh about, if only in theory.

  • Relatively Einstein -0 2 Dark Matters

  • Radio 4

Artist Cornelia Parker explores her ground-breaking (literally) work Cold Dark Matter: An Exploded View which involved getting the army to blow up a garden shed in order to re-create the first moments after the creation of space and time. Artist Cornelia Parker explores her ground-breaking (literally) work Cold Dark Matter: An Exploded View which involved getting the army to blow up a garden shed in order to re-create the first moments after the creation of space and time. As Cornelia Parker discusses her inspiration for this piece and its aims, cosmologists discuss how the Einstein's ideas shaped our notion of how the universe and everything in it got started.

Artist Cornelia Parker explores her ground-breaking (literally) work Cold Dark Matter: An Exploded View which involved getting the army to blow up a garden shed in order to re-create the first moments after the creation of space and time. Artist Cornelia Parker explores her ground-breaking (literally) work Cold Dark Matter: An Exploded View which involved getting the army to blow up a garden shed in order to re-create the first moments after the creation of space and time. As Cornelia Parker discusses her inspiration for this piece and its aims, cosmologists discuss how the Einstein's ideas shaped our notion of how the universe and everything in it got started.

  • A Passage To India

  • E.M. Forster , Penguin Books Ltd , 1936

This novel, set in India during the time of the British Raj, tells of a mysterious incident at the Marabar caves involving Adela Quested, a woman who has just arrived from England, and the presumed guilt of the charming Dr Aziz.

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  • 0-140-18076-1 2162
  • Reading
  • 2 copies
  • C1 C2

This novel, set in India during the time of the British Raj, tells of a mysterious incident at the Marabar caves involving Adela Quested, a woman who has just arrived from England, and the presumed guilt of the charming Dr Aziz.