UCL CENTRE FOR LANGUAGES & INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION (CLIE)

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185 items found in the english section!
  • Colour: The Spectrum of Science Series 1

  • BBC

Helen Czerski goes in search of colour. She reveals what it is, what it does, and why colour doesn't exist outside of our perception. This is an HQ version.

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colourhqnatural worldphysicsscience

Helen Czerski goes in search of colour. She reveals what it is, what it does, and why colour doesn't exist outside of our perception. This is an HQ version.

Since he was a teenager, Dara O Briain has been fascinated with professor Stephen Hawking, the world's most celebrated scientist. In this special film, Dara spends time with his boyhood hero as he attends the world premiere of The Theory of Everything, the movie made about his life, and then at Professor Hawking's home and place of work in Cambridge.

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biographyhistory of sciencephysicssciencestephen hawking

Since he was a teenager, Dara O Briain has been fascinated with professor Stephen Hawking, the world's most celebrated scientist. In this special film, Dara spends time with his boyhood hero as he attends the world premiere of The Theory of Everything, the movie made about his life, and then at Professor Hawking's home and place of work in Cambridge.

Professor Jim Al-Khalili sets out to discover what the universe might actually look like.

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astronomyhistory of sciencemathematicsphysicssciencespace

Professor Jim Al-Khalili sets out to discover what the universe might actually look like.

The second part, Nothing, explores science at the very limits of human perception, where we now understand the deepest mysteries of the universe lie. Jim sets out to answer one very simple question - what is nothing?

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astronomyhistory of sciencemathematicsphysicssciencespace

The second part, Nothing, explores science at the very limits of human perception, where we now understand the deepest mysteries of the universe lie. Jim sets out to answer one very simple question - what is nothing?

Engineer Jem Stansfield is used to creating explosions, but in this programme he uncovers the story of how we have learnt to control them and harness their power for our own means.

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chemistryengineeringhistory of sciencephysicsscience

Engineer Jem Stansfield is used to creating explosions, but in this programme he uncovers the story of how we have learnt to control them and harness their power for our own means.

In this film, Professor Marcus du Sautoy explores one of the most dramatic scientific announcements for a generation. In clear, simple language he tells the story of the science we thought we knew, how it is being challenged, and why it matters.

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einsteinhistory of sciencemathematicsphysicsscience

In this film, Professor Marcus du Sautoy explores one of the most dramatic scientific announcements for a generation. In clear, simple language he tells the story of the science we thought we knew, how it is being challenged, and why it matters.

As the world swaps theories on global warming, Five Disasters Waiting To Happen looks at how some of the world's leading cities are dealing with the practical reality of climate change.

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built environmentclimate changeenvironmenturban studies

As the world swaps theories on global warming, Five Disasters Waiting To Happen looks at how some of the world's leading cities are dealing with the practical reality of climate change.

Five of the world's top scientists present the revolutionary scientific inventions they believe could stop global warming and prevent worldwide disaster. Ideas include putting a giant glass sunshade in space to deflect a small portion of the sun's rays back into space and the firing ofrockets loaded with tons of sulphur into the stratosphere creating a vast, but very thin sunscreen of sulphur around the earth

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climate changeenvironmentglobal warmingscience

Five of the world's top scientists present the revolutionary scientific inventions they believe could stop global warming and prevent worldwide disaster. Ideas include putting a giant glass sunshade in space to deflect a small portion of the sun's rays back into space and the firing ofrockets loaded with tons of sulphur into the stratosphere creating a vast, but very thin sunscreen of sulphur around the earth

In this episode Brian uncovers how the stunning diversity of shapes in the natural world are shadows of the rules that govern the universe. In Spain he shows how an attempt by hundreds of people to build the highest human tower reveals the force that shapes our planet.

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chemistrycosmologynatural worldphysicsscience

In this episode Brian uncovers how the stunning diversity of shapes in the natural world are shadows of the rules that govern the universe. In Spain he shows how an attempt by hundreds of people to build the highest human tower reveals the force that shapes our planet.

Professor Brian Cox follows Earth's epic journey through space. He takes to the air in a top-secret fighter jet to race the spin of the planet and reverse the passage of the day.

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chemistrycosmologynatural worldphysicsscience

Professor Brian Cox follows Earth's epic journey through space. He takes to the air in a top-secret fighter jet to race the spin of the planet and reverse the passage of the day.

In this episode, Professor Brian Cox shows how Earth's basic ingredients, like the pure sulphur mined in the heart of a deadly volcano in Indonesia, have become the building blocks of life. Hidden deep in a cave in the Dominican Republic lies a magical world created by the same property of water that makes it essential to life.

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chemistrycosmologynatural worldphysicsscience

In this episode, Professor Brian Cox shows how Earth's basic ingredients, like the pure sulphur mined in the heart of a deadly volcano in Indonesia, have become the building blocks of life. Hidden deep in a cave in the Dominican Republic lies a magical world created by the same property of water that makes it essential to life.

In this final episode Professor Brian Cox travels to Iceland, where the delicate splendour of a moonbow reveals the colours that paint our world, and he visits a volcano to explain why the sun shines.

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chemistrycosmologynatural worldphysicsscience

In this final episode Professor Brian Cox travels to Iceland, where the delicate splendour of a moonbow reveals the colours that paint our world, and he visits a volcano to explain why the sun shines.

  • Forces of Nature with Brian Cox

  • BBC

Professor Brian Cox combines some of the most spectacular sights on Earth with our deepest understanding of the universe to reveal how the planet's beauty is created by just a handful of forces.

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chemistrycosmologynatural worldphysicsscience

Professor Brian Cox combines some of the most spectacular sights on Earth with our deepest understanding of the universe to reveal how the planet's beauty is created by just a handful of forces.

The first programme begins 350 years ago when a small group of friends, colleagues and rivals defied everything that was known about the world at that time.

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britainhistory of sciencephysicsscientist

The first programme begins 350 years ago when a small group of friends, colleagues and rivals defied everything that was known about the world at that time.

Drama-documentary relating the remarkable story of Stephen Hawking\'s early years as a PhD student at Cambridge.

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biographydramaphysicsstephen hawking

Drama-documentary relating the remarkable story of Stephen Hawking\'s early years as a PhD student at Cambridge.

lan Davies attempts to answer the proverbial question: how long is a piece of string? But what appears to be a simple task soon turns into a mind-bending voyage of discovery where nothing is as it seems.

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mathematicsnaturephysicsquantum theoryscience

lan Davies attempts to answer the proverbial question: how long is a piece of string? But what appears to be a simple task soon turns into a mind-bending voyage of discovery where nothing is as it seems.

Mathematicians have discovered there are infinitely many infinities, each one infinitely bigger than the last. And if the universe goes on forever, the consequences are even more bizarre. In an infinite universe, there are infinitely many copies of the Earth and infinitely many copies of you. Older than time, bigger than the universe and stranger than fiction. This is the story of infinity.

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infinitymathematicsphysicsscience

Mathematicians have discovered there are infinitely many infinities, each one infinitely bigger than the last. And if the universe goes on forever, the consequences are even more bizarre. In an infinite universe, there are infinitely many copies of the Earth and infinitely many copies of you. Older than time, bigger than the universe and stranger than fiction. This is the story of infinity.

Horizon takes the ultimate trip into the unknown, to explore a dizzying world of cosmic bounces, rips and multiple universes, and finds out what happened before the big bang.

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astronomynaturephysicssciencespace

Horizon takes the ultimate trip into the unknown, to explore a dizzying world of cosmic bounces, rips and multiple universes, and finds out what happened before the big bang.

Comedian Ben Miller returns to his roots as a physicist to try to answer a deceptively simple question: what is one degree of temperature?

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chemistryphysicsquantum physicsscience

Comedian Ben Miller returns to his roots as a physicist to try to answer a deceptively simple question: what is one degree of temperature?

Black holes are one of the most destructive forces in the universe, capable of tearing a planet apart and swallowing an entire star. Yet scientists now believe they could hold the key to answering the ultimate question - what was there before the Big Bang?

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astronomyblack holephysicssciencespace

Black holes are one of the most destructive forces in the universe, capable of tearing a planet apart and swallowing an entire star. Yet scientists now believe they could hold the key to answering the ultimate question - what was there before the Big Bang?

It's the process that powers the Sun, and scientists know that if they could just make nuclear fusion happen here on Earth they could solve all the world's energy problems. Billions of dollars have been spent on trying to make it happen, but now an American scientist claims to have created nuclear fusion simply by bombarding a flask of liquid with sound waves. Many scientists refuse to believe his claims, so Horizon has assembled a team to replicate the experiment. This film reveals the team's findings

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chemistryenergynuclear energynuclear fusionphysicsscience

It's the process that powers the Sun, and scientists know that if they could just make nuclear fusion happen here on Earth they could solve all the world's energy problems. Billions of dollars have been spent on trying to make it happen, but now an American scientist claims to have created nuclear fusion simply by bombarding a flask of liquid with sound waves. Many scientists refuse to believe his claims, so Horizon has assembled a team to replicate the experiment. This film reveals the team's findings

A chance to look back at a classic Horizon special in which James Burke looks at space exploration and exploitation. Originally transmitted in 1984, James begins by looking at the Apollo XI moon landing, before moving on to future space plans for humankind.

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apollo x1astronomyphysicsspacespace exploration

A chance to look back at a classic Horizon special in which James Burke looks at space exploration and exploitation. Originally transmitted in 1984, James begins by looking at the Apollo XI moon landing, before moving on to future space plans for humankind.

Professor Brian Cox takes a global journey in search of the energy source of the future. Called nuclear fusion, it is the process that fuels the sun and every other star in the universe. Yet despite over five decades of effort, scientists have been unable to get even a single watt of fusion electricity onto the grid.

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documentary-exercisenuclear energynuclear fusiononline exercisephysicsscience

Professor Brian Cox takes a global journey in search of the energy source of the future. Called nuclear fusion, it is the process that fuels the sun and every other star in the universe. Yet despite over five decades of effort, scientists have been unable to get even a single watt of fusion electricity onto the grid.

Forget the Big Bang. The real moment of creation was the moment of first light, the moment the first stars were born. Horizon tells the scientific version of the story of Genesis.

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astrologyastrophysicsphysicssciencespace

Forget the Big Bang. The real moment of creation was the moment of first light, the moment the first stars were born. Horizon tells the scientific version of the story of Genesis.

Scientists genuinely don't know what most of our universe is made of. The atoms we're made from only make up four per cent. The rest is dark matter and dark energy (for 'dark', read 'don't know'). The Large Hadron Collider at CERN has been upgraded. When it's switched on in March 2015, its collisions will have twice the energy they did before. The hope is that scientists will discover the identity of dark matter in the debris.

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astronomycolliderlarge hadronphysicsscience

Scientists genuinely don't know what most of our universe is made of. The atoms we're made from only make up four per cent. The rest is dark matter and dark energy (for 'dark', read 'don't know'). The Large Hadron Collider at CERN has been upgraded. When it's switched on in March 2015, its collisions will have twice the energy they did before. The hope is that scientists will discover the identity of dark matter in the debris.

Particle physicist Professor Brian Cox asks, 'What time is it?' It's a simple question and it sounds like it has a simple answer. But do we really know what it is that we're asking?

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particle physicsphysicsstring theorytime

Particle physicist Professor Brian Cox asks, 'What time is it?' It's a simple question and it sounds like it has a simple answer. But do we really know what it is that we're asking?

Earthquakes are among the most devastating natural disasters on the planet. In the last hundred years they have claimed the lives of over one million people. Earthquakes are destructive mainly because of their unpredictable nature. It is impossible to say accurately when a quake will strike but a new theory developed by Professor Geoffrey King could help save lives by preparing cities long in advance for an earthquake

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earthquakesgeographygeologynaturescience

Earthquakes are among the most devastating natural disasters on the planet. In the last hundred years they have claimed the lives of over one million people. Earthquakes are destructive mainly because of their unpredictable nature. It is impossible to say accurately when a quake will strike but a new theory developed by Professor Geoffrey King could help save lives by preparing cities long in advance for an earthquake

As Albert Einstein lay on his deathbed, he asked only for his glasses, his writing implements and his latest equations. He knew he was dying, yet he continued his work. In those final hours of his life, while fading in and out of consciousness, he was working on what he hoped would be his greatest work of all. It was a project of monumental complexity. It was a project that he hoped would unlock the mind of God.

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einsteinhistory of sciencephsicsquantum mechanicsreligionscience

As Albert Einstein lay on his deathbed, he asked only for his glasses, his writing implements and his latest equations. He knew he was dying, yet he continued his work. In those final hours of his life, while fading in and out of consciousness, he was working on what he hoped would be his greatest work of all. It was a project of monumental complexity. It was a project that he hoped would unlock the mind of God.

The world's oceans claim on average one ship a week, often in mysterious circumstances. With little evidence to go on, investigators usually point at human error or poor maintenance but an alarming series of disappearances and near-sinkings, including world-class vessels with unblemished track records, has prompted the search for a more sinister cause and renewed belief in a maritime myth: the wall of water

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disastergeographynatural worldnatureoceanograhyquantum physics

The world's oceans claim on average one ship a week, often in mysterious circumstances. With little evidence to go on, investigators usually point at human error or poor maintenance but an alarming series of disappearances and near-sinkings, including world-class vessels with unblemished track records, has prompted the search for a more sinister cause and renewed belief in a maritime myth: the wall of water

Dark flow is the latest in a long line of phenomena that have threatened to re-write the textbooks. Does it herald a new era of understanding, or does it simply mean that everything we know about the universe is wrong?

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astronomynaturephysicssciencespace

Dark flow is the latest in a long line of phenomena that have threatened to re-write the textbooks. Does it herald a new era of understanding, or does it simply mean that everything we know about the universe is wrong?